A History of Supreme x Nike SB Dunks

Travis Scott has been on an SB Dunk mission as of late, breaking out the “D.U.N.K.L.E’s” during his “SICKO MODE” performance with Drake and LeBron James, while also showcasing some early classics from the 2000s.

Recently he rocked the Supreme x SB Dunk Low in White/Cement while it was just a few months ago that he had been spotted with “Black Cement” Supreme Dunks. With Scott’s buzzing momentum around the SB community, he’s also made a case for the un-deadstocking of classics kicks.

Travis Scott in the Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low

For historical purposes, Supreme was Nike SB’s first official collaboration after branching out into its own division in 2002 and its held up as the Holy Grail for many collectors after all this time.

This was the first time in history that the Black/Cement colorway from the Air Jordan 3 had appeared on another shoe. Needless to say , this would become a ground-breaking maneuver that would allow both brands to reach new milestones.

Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low "Black Cement"
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low “Black Cement” (2002)

If one Cement rendition of the SB Dunk Low wasn’t enough, Supreme wasn’t holding back, reworking the Jordan 3 elements into their own colorway of the classic print.

The White/Cement offering of the skate ready Dunk would the replace red with blue on the sockliner, while this rendering too would become a grail of its own.

Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low "White Cement"
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low “White Cement” (2002)

For their second collection with Nike SB, Supreme decided to kick things up a notch or twelve, offering not two, but three variations of the Dunk High. Featuring crocodile etched panels on the overlays, each shoe exudes design elements inspired by luxury goods.

The all-over star pattern seen on the sides was initially supposed to be a repeat Nike Sportswear logo, but that conversation came to a stand still pretty quick after legal reasoning would intervene.

Nonetheless, there are still a few sample productions out there that entail the original design. Lastly, the gold lace-locks are reworked with Supreme’s namesake and a bold font as a nod to the brand’s loud and proud persona.

Supreme x Nike SB Dunk High (2003)
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk High
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk High (2003)
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk High
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk High (2003)

While the High Top versions are among the more coveted Dunk releases as a whole, the real collector gems are these rejected samples of the collaboration with the all-over Nike Sportswear branding seen throughout the quarter-panel. Apparently it was due to certain legal trademark infringements upon other luxury labels who were using a similar branding strategy.

Rejected Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low Sample (2003)
Rejected Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low Sample (2003)
Rejected Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low Sample (2003)
Rejected Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low Sample (2003)
Rejected Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low Sample (2003)
Rejected Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low Sample (2003)

Following up their iconic Cement print offerings from 2002, Supreme would celebrate the silhouette’s tenth anniversary with a follow-up rendition of the renowned pattern on the SB Dunk Low in 2012.

This iteration subs out the white or black underlays for a red leather paneling instead for a contemporary appeal that heightened the demand of SBs once again.

Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low
Supreme x Nike SB Dunk Low (2012)

 

With modern day endorsement from the likes of Travis Scott and ASAP Rocky, will another Supreme x Nike SB Dunk hit shelves in 2019?

While not much makes sense from an anniversary standpoint, there’s no denying the buzz both brands have at the moment.